About - geminagarlandlewis
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Gemina Garland-Lewis is a Seattle-based photographer, EcoHealth researcher, and National Geographic Explorer with experience in 29 countries across six continents. Both her photography and research explore the myriad connections between humans, animals, and their shared environments. She is passionate about integrating the worlds of visual storytelling and research to develop new ways of communicating social and environmental issues to broader audiences and building unique platforms for education and outreach. Her long-term projects focus on former whaling communities in the Azores, the human-animal bond in homelessness, and the interface of wildlife conservation and public health. She is a past recipient of the Thomas J. Watson Fellowship, during which she spent a year of travel focusing on different cultural attitudes towards whales and whaling in the Azores, South Africa, New Zealand, Tonga, Japan, Norway, and Argentina. This led to her 2012 work as a National Geographic Young Explorer Grantee to document the images and stories of former Azorean whalers. She is currently writing a book from her work in the Azores and beginning to document the younger generation’s connection to the whaleboats for sport. Her images were recently exhibited at the New Bedford Whaling Museum alongside National Geographic photographer O Louis Mazzatenta as part of a photographic retrospective on Azorean whaling. She has worked as a trip leader and photographer teacher for National Geographic Student Expeditions since 2010, leading in Australia, New Zealand, Italy, Tanzania, and Yellowstone and Yosemite National Parks. Her photography, writing, and stories have been featured by National Geographic News, National Geographic Adventure, and REI, among others. Gemina completed her Masters degree in Conservation Medicine at Tufts University in 2013, with a focus on the agriculture/disease interface in sub-Saharan Africa. Since finishing her MS, Gemina has worked at the Center for One Health Research at the University of Washington, where she focuses on health and disease issues at the human-animal-environment interface. She is an avid outdoor adventurer and environmental stewardship advocate. You will likely find her somewhere in the mountains or on the ocean, chasing the light with camera in tow and a silly grin on her face.